Since December 2009 – Istanbul/Turkey

Archive for March, 2010

Digital Tarkan

In Turkey, like in many other countries, the demand for portable music is high. Mobile operators are aware of this demand and offering their customers digital music services.

Turkey’s Avea is one of these operators who has made thousands of tracks available for their subscribers who can download them directly on their mobile phones and computers using the company’s online music store “aveamuzik.com”. And Avea has now launched the Avea Music Awards on their digital platform. Avea subscribers will vote online for their favorite artists whose work has been available on aveamuzik.com.

Avea Müzik is using the ad above in its promotional campaign for the music awards. We believe that TarkanPLUS International readers will enjoy spotting Tarkan’s name in the ad along with other artists such as Ajda Pekkan, Şebnem Ferah, Mustafa Ceceli, Candan Erçetin.

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Tarkan and Cut-and-Paste Journalism

Tarkan Waving His Fans After Release Photo: NTVMSNBC

The latest reports of the Turkish newspapers about Tarkan since last Friday have had one thing in common: Tarkan’s blood and urine samples and the details of his conversations on the phone.

It all started with Star Newspaper’s report saying that the Turkish Institute of Forensic Medicine’s report revealed Tarkan consumed drugs. Star also wrote that they discovered the details of Tarkan’s phone conversations revealing his addiction. All this was big news, of course. And soon it was posted on the websites of newspapers.

What is wrong was not for all other websites and the following day’s papers to give this as “breaking news” but for them to have used the same piece of information without verifying or proofreading it. Even the spelling mistake regarding Star newspaper’s title was retained in these articles. This was nothing but “cut-and-paste” journalism – extremely embarrassing for the Turkish press.

Another issue this forces us to consider and reconsider is the confidentiality of information. How can a report by the Turkish Institution of Forensic Medicine become so easily available for the press when Tarkan’s case is still in progress.

Eventually, in response to the information being circulated in the press, Tarkan’s lawyer rejected all accusations, claiming that Tarkan was not even tested while in custody. (His statement was published in Milliyet on Sunday.)

Whatever the truth is, we have no access to it at the moment. We have to wait and see. However, if all that has been written were not facts, then this wouldn’t be considered “responsible journalism”.